Reminder: Please keep up with the 40 Book Challenge! This is a great way to motivate yourselves to read more and find out what type of books you are really passionate about!


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Resources for Research
Week of May 15th-19th
  • Research Based Information Writing
    • Session 9: Writing with Detail
    • Skip 10
    • Session 11: Using Text Features to Strengthen Writing
    • Session 12: Planning Ready-to-Go Chapters & Crafting Introductions that Frame Each Chapter
    • Session 13: Quoting with a Purpose in Mind
    • Take the quotes that you found and incorporate them into your chapters. Remember:
      1. Don’t just plop your quotations into your writing randomly. Make sure they fit into your writing.
      2. Use lead-ins like:
        1. “According to…”
        2. “(So and so) writes,...”
      3. Explain why the quote is important.
      “This shocking statistic shows…”
      “This quote is important because…”
      “This revealing statement highlights…”

Week of May 15th-19th
  • Research Based Information Writing
    • Session 5: The Trail of Research
    • Session 6: Envisioning Structures to Plan an Information Book
    • Session 7: Constructing Texts with Solid Bricks of Information
    • Session 8: Gathering Specific Information

Week of May 8th-May 12th
  • Research Based Information Writing
    • Session 1: Becoming Engaged with a Topic
    • Session 2: Reading for a Wide View on a Topic -- Research Teen Activism (3 sets of notes in different styles)
    • Session 3: Preparing to Write Informational Essays
    • Session 4: Structure Sets You Free


Week of April 24th- April 28th

Day

Chu Ju

Enrique

Hare

Bamboo

Bread

Long Walk

11
11
Epilogue
22, 23
18, 19, 20, 21
13
Child Soldier
12
12
Afterword
24, 25
22, 23, 24
14


13


Notes
26-END
25, 26, end
15, Note
















*Prompts 8, 13, 16 in Book Club packet (after days 9 & 10 reading)
*Prompts 14 & 18 after day 11 reading
*Prompts 6, 9, & 19 after finishing the book

Prompts we've completed:
4,5, 6, 7,8, 9,10,12,13,14,16,18, & 19


Week of April 17th - April 21st
  • Completed the 'Using Prepositional Phrases' packet
  • Prepositions provide information on location, descriptions of people and things, time, and ideas
  • Prepositional phrases occur at the beginning of a sentence (opener), between a subject and a verb (s-v split), or at the end of a sentence (closer)
  • A prepositional phrase begins with the preposition and ends with a noun

5th and 6th Grade:

Day

Chu Ju

Enrique

Hare

Bamboo

Bread

Long Walk

7
7
6
14, 15
25, 26, 27, 1
9
13, 14
8
8
7, 8
16, 17
2, 3, 4, 5, 6
10
15, 16
9
9
9
18, 19
7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
11
17
10
10
10
20, 21
13, 14, 15, 16, 17
12
Message and Author's Note
*Prompts 5, 10 & 12 in Book Club packet

Week of April 10th - April 15th

5th and 6th Grade:

Day

Chu Ju

Enrique

Hare

Bamboo

Bread

Long Walk

4
4
3
8, 9
12, 13, 14, 15, 16
4
7,8
5
5
4
10, 11
17, 18, 19, 20

5, 6
9, 10
6
6
5
12, 13
21, 22, 23, 24
7,8
11, 12
*Prompts 4 & 15 in Book Club packet


Week of March 27th - March 30th
5th and 6th Grade:

Day

Chu Ju

Enrique

Hare

Bamboo

Bread

Long Walk

1
1
Prologue
Prologue, 1, 2
1, 2, 3
1
1, 2
2
2
1
3, 4, 5
4, 5, 6, 7
2
3, 4
3
3
2
6, 7
8, 9, 10, 11
3
5, 6
*Prompt 7 in Book Club packet -- We will be using the book club packet to write about our reading. This is also a way to share what we've read in a fun way.

Week of March 13th-17th
  • Literary Essay due Thursday, March 16
  • Remember to Use Transitional Words and Phrases to Help Your Essay “Flow”

  • Make sure you are following the plan and including ALL elements of the Literary Essay

  • EXAMPLE:
    • Reason: One way that Georgina shows her lack of maturity is through her negative responses to situations she is placed in.
    • Evidence: Early on in the novel, Georgina's family moved to a run-down house. Georgina was unhappy with the house because it was not what she had expected, so she refuses to go inside. (PARAPHRASED)
    • Connection Statement:This temper-tantrum shows just how immature Georgina really is.
Week of March 6th-10th
  • Continue Working on Literary Essays
    • Students have created a claim about a character from the book, The Watsons Go to Birmingham - 1963
    • The claim is supported by the evidence the students have collected from the book (direct quotes and paraphrasing)
  • Peer Conferencing Literary Essays
    • Peer reviewers help identify strengths and set goals for revisions
  • Make sure you have created a strong claim and developed reasons to support your claim
  • March R+E due March 30th


Week of February 27th-March 3rd
  • Literary Essay: Introductory Paragraph draft
    • Like a funnel -- Start with a broad statement about the topic (or a summary). Then, narrow it down to the claim.
    • Introduction cohesively includes: important ideas related to the story, summary, claim.
  • Conclusion draft
    • Restate the claim, Summarize your evidence/examples, Show the significance of the theme by relating it to your own life and the real world

Week of February 13th-17th

  • Begin drafting body paragraphs of Literary Essay
    • Has a clear focus from the claim using key words. Evidence supports claim in various ways [quoted, paraphrased]. Reasoning statements are positions AFTER the evidence to connect to the claim. DON'T FORGET TRANSITIONAL WORDING AND LITERARY LANGUAGE!

Week of February 20th-24th

  • Mid Winter break! ENJOY!

Week of January 3rd-6th

  • Happy New Year!
  • This week we will continue to read Watsons' and do journal entries responding to what we read; this will help students prepare for their next big writing assignment: literary essay (details will come later)
  • The next R+E will be due Jan. 31st (book needs to be chosen by THIS friday)

Weeks of December 12th-22nd

  • We will be starting to read The Watsons Go to Birmingham in class daily. There will be a packet that will be filled out as we go with signposts that we notice in each chapter. Additionally, there will be journal entries and short writing prompts to keep writing skills strong
  • R+E presentations will be due on Wednesday, Dec. 21st (please let me know if you will be absent on that day)
  • **Everyone should have turned in a fresh printed copy of their narrative with corrections fixed or made

Week of December 5th-9th:

  • We will be mostly working on our Signpost Packets (C&C, Aha Moments, Tough Questions, Words of the Wiser, A&A). Students will see video and book examples and begin looking for them in texts on their own
  • Personal Narrative grades will be posted in the afternoon on Dec. 6th. Corrections will be required (with parent signature) and every student will need to print a fresh copy for our class anthology.

Weeks of November 21-December 2nd:

  • Today, the 21st, will be the last day of in-class revisions. The peer-revision checklist handout (for those who are not absent this week) must be attached to the personal narrative
  • Quick guidelines for the final, printed narrative due Wed. Nov. 30th: double spaced, times new roman size 12 font, name, and title must be done

Week of November 14th-18th:

  • We will be practicing finding Thought, Action, Dialogue, Lead, Description, and Ending in our narratives and looking for patterns
  • This week focuses on revising the personal narratives. Students will be sharing with their peers and myself to work on creating one polished draft that will become their final copy
  • Things to work on: introductions, conclusions, emotion, description

Week of November 7th-11th:

  • This week we are working on developing our personal narratives into polished pieces of writing
  • Each student should have chosen ONE personal narrative that they will continue to edit and revise over the next week
  • Things to focus on:
    • Elaborating small moments in extreme detail and description
    • Think about including a moment from the past or future to further develop story and to add depth
    • Ask: What is my story REALLY about?
  • We will be typing up these drafts in the computer lab in the later half of the week

Tuesday October 25th!

Teaching Point:
Writers stay inside the narrator’s point of view - telling the details of the story exactly the way the narrator perceived them at the moment.

As you write a new Small Moment story, remember to stay in the perspective of the narrator (you!), zooming in on exactly what you saw, felt, heard, said, did, and thought. Be careful not to slip into the point of view of other characters.




Reminder: Strategies for Generating Personal Narrative Topics:

  • Think of a person who matters to you, list Small Moment stories, choose one, and write the whole story.
  • Think about a place that matters, use pictures and notes to jot about the small moments that occurred there, choose one, and write the whole story.
  • Think of first times or last timesyou did something, list Small Moment stories you could tell about each, choose one, and write the whole story.
Think of moments that really mattered because you realized or learned something new, list those moments, choose one, and write the whole story.